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LATEST REVIEWS

Division of Laura Lee
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File Under: Rock & Roll
rating: B+
tracks

1. Sittin' Pretty

2. MF From Hell

3. Lady

4. Harmonic Generator

5. What Would I Know 

6. At Your Touch

7. Fink For The Man

8. In Love

9. You Build Me Up

10. Freeze Sucker

related links
  • The Datsuns
  • V2 Records
  • BMG Records
  • The Datsuns
    Self Titled

    V2. / BMG
    by Tom Fraher

    A traditional rock assault from New Zealand, the Datsuns ride the wave of bringing back the rock to its purer form. With vocal chord-rending lines and shredding guitars, The Datsuns rocks hard and loud, and they pack a relentless punch that never waivers.

    "Motherfucker from Hell" sounds like a hardcore version of a classic rock song. They don't let up at all: just when the track changes, they come right back, and they won't let go. Even with "Lady," the jumping grooves changing up the tempo don't let the rock subside.

    "Harmonic Generator" is a beat-heavy song, complete with sing along backups and a true guitar solo: barely any accompaniment, with minimal drums, which builds up into an all out pounding climax. "What Would I Know" sounds like Alice Cooper with a 21st century take.

    The album gets better as each track progresses: the last few songs standout by far from the rest of the album. "Fink for the Man" has a nice, rolling instrumental intro, and pounds into the first verse unexpectedly. "In Love" employs humming keyboard chords in the background, in true classic rock fashion. Talking about all the women they've loved and left, the Datsuns throw attitude and raw energy together to make a wild, bold sound of pure rock.

    The Datsuns stand up as a strong band, who know how to play hard and loud. They take the rock and roll formula and put their own twist on it. Yet, their debut album leaves much to be desired; from listening, one can hear the further potential that they seem to be heading towards. Though the album is a consistent, unrelenting frenzy, at times it seems to not change.

    The last few songs do stand out, but as a whole, there is not much to distinguish between tracks. But isn't that what rock and roll is all about? Nothing matters as long as it rocks? The Datsuns agree wholeheartedly.


    Tom Fraher is a Contributing Writer. Contact him at tomf@rockzone.com.

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